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3 ways that mediation can help you maintain control

When you are in the middle of a divorce, it can seem like everything is out of control. The future that you had planned is suddenly changing, and it can be easy to get sucked into a cycle of bitterness and resentment towards your ex. If you want to minimize conflict and maintain control over your life and divorce, mediation may provide the solution that you have been looking for.

Mediation allows separating couples to avoid court and instead hammer out the details of their divorce in a neutral, mediated environment. According to the American Bar Association, it is generally a shorter process than a litigated divorce, and this means it is also less expensive. How can mediation help you maintain control, too?

4 myths about divorce mediation

The divorce rate has slowly declined in Texas. In 2015, there were only 2.6 divorces for every 1,000 inhabitants, which is down from a divorce rate of 5.5 in 1990. 

Before any couple proceeds with the divorce, both people should seriously consider going through mediation. Although many people associate mediation with uncontested divorces, they can be beneficial even if the couple has significant disagreements about how to divide assets. You may decide mediation is best for your divorce after you realize the following common myths are not actually true. 

Should my new spouse have a say in what my children do?

When you remarry, it is normal to wonder about the role that your new spouse will play in your children's lives. For example, what say, if any, should the new spouse have in what your children do? Does the spouse weigh in on rules? Do you expect your spouse to help pay for your children?

There are no easy, cut-and-dried answers. What is best depends on many factors and can change considerably in just a short time. Here are some things to think about as you ponder this question.

What happens to military pension after divorce?

If you are a member of the U.S. Armed Forces, or if you are currently involved in a divorce from a member of the U.S. Armed Forces, you may have questions about the division of military pension once your marriage officially ends. Maybe you have concerns about having to share your pension with your former spouse, or maybe you feel you have a right to at least some of it and want to make sure you understand your future needs with regard to saving.

Regardless of your reason for asking, there are certain rules that govern how couples divide military pension in divorce. In Texas, which is a community property state, any money given to the military retirement account during the marriage becomes the property of both parties. However, any money placed in the account prior to the marriage remains the exclusive property of the military member.

How does divorce mediation work?

If you are contemplating a Texas divorce, your life undoubtedly is in turmoil right now. Not only are all your hopes and dreams crashing around you, you and your spouse likely have numerous issues regarding your children, the possibility of spousal support, and how you will divide your marital property. Nevertheless, it is highly unlikely that either of you looks forward to an expensive, protracted and nasty divorce. Surely there must be a better, less stressful way to split up.

There is. Today, more and more divorcing couples are finding that mediation is the answer they are searching for. Unlike a traditional litigated divorce, mediation lets you and your spouse maintain control over your respective lives by making your own decisions, not leaving those decisions up to a judge.

Key benefits of divorce mediation

Couples who get married usually plan to be together forever. However, that does not always occur. For those who may be contemplating a divorce, it can be helpful to understand a few things about the process.

Outside of court, divorce mediation is a common option for dissolving a marriage. There are a few key benefits in choosing mediation.

What schools should do for you and your co-parent

By now, schools are used to students who have divorced parents. However, some schools and teachers are better at handling these situations than others. Still, you and your co-parent should expect a minimum of consideration from the school.

To that end, here is a look at how schools should communicate with co-parents who have legal custody of their children.

3 essential tips for divorcing peacefully

Contrary to what you may believe, your divorce does not need to be nasty. While it will probably be painful and difficult at times, you and your soon-to-be ex-spouse may be able to work together to get an amicable divorce. It will be better for everyone–including your kids–to divorce as quickly and harmoniously as possible. 

So how can you avoid wasting years and tons of money in a contentious divorce? Here are some guidelines for ending your marriage as smoothly as possible.

3 tips for co-parenting during parent-teacher conferences

Parent-teacher conferences are often a joyous occasion. In addition to meeting your child’s teachers and getting acquainted with their curriculum, you may learn about your kid’s success in class and hear more about her or his academic strengths. You will likely emerge from the conference a proud parent, but the stress from sharing the time with your ex may put a damper on the excitement and pride you should be feeling.

It is important to develop some co-parenting strategies prior to attending the parent-teacher conference. Utilizing the following tips can help prevent tension and ensure the meeting is a productive discussion of your child’s academic performance. 

Prenuptial agreements and your divorce

If you entered into a prenuptial agreement, you need to know how its provisions can affect the course of your divorce proceedings.

Signing a prenuptial agreement can be a good way to protect your finances in the event of a future split. While the law generally wants people to have the freedom of choosing what to agree on, there are some areas where courts are unlikely to enforce prenups.

How To Avoid The Courtroom

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  • ABA | American Bar Association
  • Frisco Bar | The State Of Texas | Association
  • State Bar Of Texas | Created in 1939