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Frisco child custody attorneyAs marijuana use becomes more acceptable all over the U.S., it has increasingly become legal for recreational purposes in many states around Texas. This has made marijuana easy and inexpensive to get, and many parents may use marijuana without thinking twice about potential consequences for a child custody case. 

Unfortunately for Texans who enjoy THC, recreational marijuana is still illegal. If you are getting divorced or are trying to get custody of your children, using marijuana - even when you are not around them - can negatively impact your case. 

Marijuana and Texas Family Courts

When Texas judges are making decisions about which parent will have conservatorship of or possession and access to a child, they will consider the child’s best interests first and foremost. If a parent is using marijuana illegally, this could easily reflect poorly on a court’s perception of that parent. Even if a parent is using medical marijuana, allegations that marijuana or any other substance is used unsafely or irresponsible could negatively impact a judge’s willingness to see a child spend significant time with that parent. 

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Collin County child custody attorney Divorces with minor children and custody disputes in Texas can be emotionally charged and hard to resolve. Parents with the best intentions often find themselves locked in disagreement or vengefulness, and the best interests of a child may end up getting overlooked. 

In cases involving minor children, Texas courts may appoint a person called a “guardian ad litem.” While this may seem like a fancy Latin name, a guardian ad litem is simply a person who is in charge of finding out what would be in a child’s best interests. In this blog, we will discuss what a guardian ad litem is and what she does in a Texas divorce or custody dispute. 

What is a Guardian ad Litem? 

A guardian ad litem is an agent of a Texas family court. Her job is to act as a representative for a child and speak for the child’s interests when necessary. Guardians ad litem are often appointed in complex cases in which it may be difficult for a judge to determine a child’s best interests. Guardians ad litem are only involved during the court case and do not continue to represent a child forever. One parent or both parents may be ordered to pay for the cost of the guardian ad litem in their case. 

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Tips for Co-Parenting After Divorce

Posted on in Child Custody

Frisco child custody lawyerWhen a couple with children goes through a divorce, in most cases, they still must have some kind of relationship with each other as they co-parent their children together. Some parents are able to develop a routine that works for their family with little or no conflict at all. Unfortunately, many other parents experience difficulties as they try to work through residual acrimony left over from the divorce that often spills over into their co-parenting relationship.

Having a solid parenting pan in place can help reduce these conflicts and make everyone’s lives – especially the children’s – so much less stressful. The following are some co-parenting tips that can also be helpful.

Promote Consistency

Although you and your ex-spouse are no longer married and parenting under the same roof, you both need to remain on the same page when it comes to how you deal with your children. Although not all rules will be the same at both parents’ homes, having consistency in bedtimes, activities, and allowed behaviors goes a long way in helping children adjust to their new life of having two homes and two routines.

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Frisco family law attorneyDealing with a child custody dispute can be enormously stressful. After all, your child’s wellbeing could be on the line, and so, too, could your relationship with him or her. The conflict that’s present in one of these disputes can be exacerbated when one parent thinks that the other is intentionally trying to cut him or her out of the child’s life. In some instances, this could be considered parental alienation.

The Basics of Parental Alienation

In its most basic terms, parental alienation occurs when one parent actively manipulates a child in hopes of creating distance between that child and his or her other parent. Oftentimes this manipulation is aimed at obtaining a more restrictive child custody order that further cuts the other parent out of the child’s life.

What Does Parental Alienation Look Like?

The breadth and severity of parental alienation can be massive. It can be as simple as failing to keep the other parent apprised of the child’s activities and medical appointments, or it could be as severe as to program a child to believe that he or she was abused or neglected by the other parent. The latter is often achieved by creating false memories.

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There are many people living in Texas who are in the military. They provide a very valuable and honorable service to this country. In providing this service they make many sacrifices in their personal lives. They may be required to move to different bases in very different locations. They can also be deployed to other countries with relatively little notice. They also need to perform very difficult tasks under very difficult circumstances while they are deployed.

While they are deployed they are not able to bring their families with them and are forced to spend large amounts of time apart from family and loved ones. This can be very difficult for the servicemember and their family. It can also create a difficult situation for parents who are no longer with the other parent and have or need to have custody orders dictating when they will have their children in their care. These decisions are made based on the best interests of the children.

Factors military parents need to consider for custody

The fact that a parent is in the military does not mean that it is not in children’s best interest to be in their care, but due to the unique circumstances mentioned above, military parents need to consider those factors when developing parenting plans and custody arrangements. Parents will need to determine who will care for the children while they are gone. What will happen when they return from deployment, how they will communicate with the children during deployment and other factors.

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