History of and reasons for divorce

| Aug 7, 2020 | Divorce |

If you are married and considering divorce in Texas, you are not alone. There are several reasons why a marriage can fall apart, and divorce has lost the taboo that it had among older generations. Nearly half of first-time marriages, 42%, end in divorce, and that percentage increases with each subsequent marriage.

What is no-fault divorce?

Several decades ago, states did not allow married couples to get a divorce without a substantial reason, such as adultery or domestic abuse. Though these laws were presumably intended to protect the sanctity of marriage, they resulted in some fabricated stories from individuals stuck in a bad marriage. The rise in divorce rates in recent years is likely due in part to the advent of no-fault divorce, which allows individuals to get a divorce without proving that the other spouse committed a major transgression. Now, you can file for a divorce and simply claim that you and your spouse have irreconcilable differences.

Bad acts leading to divorce

Though you no longer need to allege fault when seeking a divorce, adultery and domestic violence remain common reasons why some spouses want to separate. Adultery may give individuals even more of a reason to separate given the prevalence and growing understanding of STDs.

Incompatibility

Many marriages dissolve because spouses cannot get on the same page regarding things like child upbringing, politics, money, and the roles and responsibilities of each spouse. Differences of opinion often stem from spouses having different cultural or religious backgrounds, which includes spouses being of different races.

Lack of intimacy

Another common cause of divorce is lack of intimacy and a loss of the romantic spark after years of marriage. When one spouse wants more intimacy than the other, it can drive an emotional wedge into the relationship and cause a disconnect among spouses.

Whatever your reason for considering divorce, help is available. A family law attorney may assist with negotiating how to divide community property and may also help draft a divorce settlement.